212) S.T.T.F. Day 8 (Guest Room)

by Gail on April 24, 2014

Our Sprint to the Finish campaign is steady and productive. To begin with today, you may remember this staircase I painted last year:

painted stairs 3

sky-painted stairs

What the pictures didn’t show was finished drawers. I had some trouble getting the painted drawer fronts attached to the installed drawers. They restricted the smooth opening by scraping on the treads, or were misaligned, or I couldn’t get the screws in tightly, so that the drawer fronts flopped around a bit.

Rob had a neat trick. First, he trimmed my drawer fronts with a plane, to adjust the size. Then, he used the heavy double-sided foam tape – the same kind that mirror installers use to hold mirrors in place while the construction glue dries.taping drawer front on - tip

He put the tape on to the front of the box, then pressed the drawer front onto it, lining it up, and using a spacer under the drawer front which allowed just enough space to extend the drawer fully open. taping drawer on stairs

Next, he removed the whole drawer and screwed the front to the boxes from inside the drawer. He also installed the two remaining vintage Bakelite handles.painted stair risers

It was a fiddly job, as most finishing jobs are, but the drawers are working perfectly and look great.drawers in stairs

Next up was starting the guest room renovation. A couple years back, I paid $10 at the thrift store for a stained oak headboard . It reminded me of the one my parents had in my childhood home, complete with built-in reading lights. On one of the many rainy days when working outside in the garden was torture, one of my WWOOFers painted it this midnight blue.Thrift store headboard

Rob built a box the exact dimensions (width and depth) as the headboardplywood base for headboard

and I gave it two coats of the same blue.

He assembled the two partsheadboard back

and added a thin trim piece where they joined.finished headboard

He installed the vintage reading lights I had found at thrift stores. We cut off the plugs ends so that the electrical cords could be inserted into an inconspicuous small hole to the back of the headboard, then reattached plug ends. The plugs will be hidden inside the box where a wall outlet is available.

headboard with light

Also needing attention was the cupboard above the closet in that room. It has been an ugly hole that houses electrical wires, built-in vacuum tubes, and heating ducts.

Rob cleverly crafted a frame to hide the rough framing, and built a couple of lovely doors to fit just so. guest bedroom closet

When the door hinges could not be made to fit, we scratched our heads, tried different adjustments and replaced fittings. Rob finally concluded that the 1.25″ thickness of the doors was the culprit. He trimmed the thickness down to the 3/4″ standard cabinet door thickness on his table saw, and, sure enough, the hinges worked! door hinges

Now, the house guts are hidden, the doors look fabulous, and Rob and I both learned another lesson in building.guest room cupboard

And, finally, we started a secret project that had us building a 4′ grid on the ceiling. It was tough finding those ceiling joists with the stud finder.finding joists

I dug up an old photograph of that room construction. It showed the location of the joistsbasement bed studs

and Rob patiently marked where they were on the finished ceiling.

chalklines on ceiling

Then, we installed a 4′ grid with 2x2s and long screws.

guest room grid

I’m not telling you (yet) what I’m doing. If you’re curious, I’ll be updating when there is more progress in the guest room. I’d be delighted if you paid me another visit.

The next report will be coming to you “live from the loft,” where we move to next, in our Sprint To The Finish.

 

Sharing with: The Brambleberry Cottage, Common Ground , Rooted in Thyme, The Charm of Home, Dwellings The Heart of Your Home, Coastal Charm, Home Stories A to Z, DIY By Design

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